March 31, 2013

Hymns and Marian Antiphons from the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Alphabetical index of all hymns and Marian Antiphons included in the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (1988) , by the Catholic Book Publishing Company. The Little Office is a variation of the Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Liturgy of the Hours and is prayed in addition to the Divine Office. Rather than the 4 week cycle of the Breviary, it follows a simpler 1 week cycle. For those interested in the Divine Office but are unsure about the cost of a Breviary and it's complexity, the Little Office of the B.V.M. provides new comers an easy to use and affordable alternative. The earliest recorded use of the devotion was in the 8th century at the Benedictine Monastery of Monte Cassino when the practice received approval from Pope Zachary (679-752). From there it spread to other Monastic communities, often with considerable variation, and eventually became popular with secular clergy, Third Orders, and devout Laity. It was standardized by St. Pius V (1504-1572) in 1585 and revised by St. Pius X (1835-1914) in 1910. The reforms of Vatican II recommended the use of the Liturgy of the Hours in place of the Little Office, and consequently did not revise it. None the less, Religious Orders and publishers have produced new versions approved for private or community devotions. As well, Benedict XVI's 2007 Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum made it again possible for the approved use of the 1961 Latin text of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Related Post: Index of Marian Hymns and Antiphons.

Alma Redemptoris Mater
Ave Maria
Ave Regina Caelorum
Breathe On Me, Breath of God
Firmly I Believe and Truly
From All That Dwell Below the Skies
Hail, Holy Queen
Hail, Queen of Heaven, the Ocean Star
Help Us, O Lord
Lord God and Maker of All Things
Lord of All Hopefulness
Mary, Crowned with Living Light
Mary Immaculate, Star of the Morning
Mary the Dawn
O Christ, You are the Light and Day
O Mary, of All Women
Praise to Mary, Heaven's Gate
Regina Caeli
Salve Regina
The God Whom Earth and Sea and Sky
Virgin-Born, We Bow Before You
What Child is This
Ye Who Own the Faith of Jesus

March 30, 2013

Hail, Queen of Heaven, the Ocean Star / Ave Maris Stella

Guide Of The Wanderer Here Below
Hail Queen of Heaven, the Ocean Star is based on the Latin hymn, Ave Maris Stella. This Medieval plainchant has been traditionally used in the Roman Breviary at Vespers on Marian Feast Days. The Catholic Priest and historian, Fr. John Lingard (1771–1851) composed the hymn Hail Queen of Heaven, the Ocean Star based upon the ancient Latin text. It was first published in Easy Hymn Tunes for Catholic Schools (1851) and matched with the melody: Stella, a folk tune the editor had heard sung by children in the village of Stella, near Newcastle-Upon-Tyme. An alternative translation of Ave Maris Stella is: Praise to Mary, Heaven's Gate.


Tune: Stella

HAIL, QUEEN OF HEAVEN, THE OCEAN STAR by John Lingard, 1851 (Public Domain)

1. Hail, Queen of heaven, the ocean star,
Guide of the wanderer here below,
Thrown on life's surge, we claim thy care,
Save us from peril and from woe.
Mother of Christ, Star of the sea
Pray for the wanderer, pray for me.

2. O gentle, chaste, and spotless Maid,
We sinners make our prayers through thee;
Remind thy Son that He has paid
The price of our iniquity.
Virgin most pure, Star of the sea,
Pray for the sinner, pray for me.

3. Sojourners in this vale of tears,
Blest advocate, to thee we cry,
Assuage our sorrows, calm our fears,
And soothe with hope our misery. 
Refuge in grief, Star of the sea
Pray for the mourner, pray for me.

4. And while to Him Who reigns above
In Godhead one, in Persons three,
The Source of life, of grace, of love,
Homage we pay on bended knee:
Do thou, bright Queen, Star of the sea,
Pray for thy children, pray for me.


Gregorian (Sung by the Daughters of St. Paul)

AVE MARIS STELLA (Public Domain)

1. Ave maris stella,
Dei Mater alma,
atque semper Virgo,
felix caeli porta.

2. Sumens illud Ave
Gabrielis ore,
funda nos in pace,
mutans Hevae nomen.

3. Solve vincula reis,
profer lumen caecis
mala nostra pelle,
bona cuncta posce.

4. Monstra te esse matrem:
sumat per te preces,
qui pro nobis natus,
tulit esse tuus.

5. Virgo singularis,
inter omnes mites,
nos culpis solutos,
mites fac et castos.

6. Vitam praesta puram,
iter para tutum:
ut videntes Iesum
semper collaetemur.

7. Sit laus Deo Patri,
summo Christo decus,
Spiritui Sancto,
tribus honor unus. Amen.

Queen of Heaven, Rejoice / Regina Caeli

Basilica of the Assumption, Covington KY - Courtesy of Wikipedia

Queen of Heaven, Rejoice is an anonymous translation of the 12th century Latin hymn: Regina Cæli which is traditionally sung as a Marian antiphon after Compline in the Roman Breviary from Easter till Pentecost. An ancient tradition relates how at Easter time in the year 596, as Rome suffered from a great pestilence, Pope St. Gregory the Great (c.540-604), barefoot and holding an icon of the Madonna said to have been painted by St. Luke, heard the first three lines of Regina Cæli sung by angels as he led a procession through the city at dawn to entreat deliverance. He answered them with: "Ora pro nobis Deum. Alleluia!", and saw a vision of an angel with sword, readied for battle. From that day, the pestilence is said to have ceased. In the Divine Office (1974), the Liturgy of the Hours (1975), and the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Regina Cœli is sung at the conclusion of Night Prayer. In the Divine Office (1974), Queen of Heaven, Rejoice is sung as a final anthem after Night Prayer.



Regina coeli laetare, Alleluia,
Quia quem meruisti portare. Alleluia,
Resurrexit, Sicut dixit, Alleluia.
Ora pro nobis Deum. Alleluia.

March 29, 2013

Mother of Christ, Hear Thou Thy People's Cry / Alma Redemptoris Mater

Gate of Heaven

Mother of Christ, Hear Thou Thy People's Cry is a translation by of the 11th century Latin hymn, Alma Redemptoris Mater composed by the Benedictine Abbot, St. Hermann Contractus of Reichenau (1013-1054). Crippled from birth and suffering from a paralytic condition, at the age of 7 he was placed in the care of the Benedictine monks on the Monastic Island of Reichenau. The Abbey was a center of arts and learning at the time. There he excelled, becoming an expert scholar, composer, music theorist, mathematician, and astronomer. Alma Redemptoris Mater was traditionally sung after Compline in the Roman Breviary and used from the First Sunday of Advent to the Feast of Purification (Feb. 2). In 1849 it was translated into English as Mother of Christ, Hear Thou Thy People's Cry by Fr. Edward Caswall and included in his collection, the Lyra Catholica.

MOTHER OF CHRIST, HEAR THOU THY PEOPLE'S CRY by Edward Caswall, 1849 (Public Domain)

Mother of Christ, hear thou thy people's cry
Star of the deep and Portal of the sky!
Mother of Him who thee made from nothing made.
Sinking we strive and call to thee for aid:
Oh, by what joy which Gabriel brought to thee,
Thou Virgin first and last, let us thy mercy see.



Alma Redemptoris Mater, quae pervia caeli
Porta manes, et stella maris, succurre cadenti,
Surgere qui curat, populo: tu quae genuisti,
Natura mirante, tuum sanctum Genitorem
Virgo prius ac posterius, Gabrielis ab ore
Sumens illud Ave, peccatorum miserere.

Hail, Our Queen and Mother Blest / Salve Regina

Mother of Mercy

Hail, Our Queen and Mother Blest is a translation of the Latin hymn, Salve Regina. This translation, used as an Antiphon sung after Night Prayer in modern Divine Office is set to the tune, Gaudeamus Pariter (Ave Virgo Virginum) composed by Johann Roh (c.1495-1547) and adapted in 1584 by Johann Leisentrit (1527-1586). The lyrics can be found here, under the heading: "English hymns based on the Latin original". Salve Regina (see 2nd video) is an anonymous Latin hymn that dates back to the Middle Ages. It is one of four Marian antiphons traditionally sung after Compline in the Roman Breviary. Authorship is uncertain, but modern research suggests the Benedictine Abbot, St. Hermann of Reichenau (1013-1054) as the most likely composer. Crippled from birth and suffering from a paralytic condition, at the age of 7 he was placed in the care of the Benedictine monks on the Monastic Island of Reichenau. The Abbey was a center of arts and learning at the time. There he thrived, becoming an expert scholar, composer, music theorist, mathematician, and astronomer. He is also credited with the composition of another of the Marian antiphon's, Alma Redemptoris Mater. The text of Salve Regina in it's current form was set down at Cluny Abbey in the 12th century. In the Liturgy of the Hours and the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary it is sung or recited at the conclusion of Night Prayer. It is also included as an optional hymn for Monday Evening Prayer in the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary.


Tune: Gaudeamus Pariter

SALVE REGINA

Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae,
Vita dulcedo et spes nostra salve.
Ad te clamamus exsules filii Hevae.
Ad te suspiramus gementes et flentes,
in hac lacrimarum valle.

Eja ergo advocata nostra,
illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte.
Et Jesum benedictum fructum ventris tui
nobis post hoc exsilium ostende.
O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria.


Gregorian

March 27, 2013

Liturgical Guide: Easter


The hymns used during the Easter Season in the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) recall the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus on Easter Sunday and then through the next 50 days ending with Pentecost, we along with the Disciples encounter the risen Christ. In the following video, Fr. James Kubicki, SJ of the Apostleship of Prayer shares some of Pope Benedict XVI's refections on the Easter Season. He draws our attention to the women who went to the tomb to anoint Jesus' body, but instead found him risen and alive. Jesus told them to not be afraid, but to go tell the Good News to the Apostles. Like them, we too should not be afraid to proclaim the risen Christ. Our faith is not born from an acceptance of a Doctrine, but from an encounter with a person - Jesus, and he is risen and remains with us!



LITURGY OF THE HOURS (1975)
14. All Creatures of Our God and King
98. Keep in Mind
112. Alleluia, The Strife is O'er
113. In the Midst of Death (We Who Were Once Dead)
114. I Am the Bread of Life
115. Christ Jesus Lay in Death's Strong Bands
116. At the Lamb's High Feast
117. The Day of Resurrection
118. Jesus Christ is Ris'n Today
119. Ye Sons and Daughters
120. Christ the Lord is Risen Today (Wesley)
121. Alleluia! Sing to Jesus
122. Hail Thee, Festival Day
123. Christ the Lord is Risen Today (Leeson)

DIVINE OFFICE (1974)
25. Christ the Lord is Risen Again
26. Easter Glory Fills the Sky
27. Alleluia, Sing to Jesus
28. At the Lamb’s High Feast
29. Proclaim his Triumph, Heaven and Earth
30. Come Ye Faithful, Raise the Strain
31. Battle is O'er

ROMAN BREVIARY
Claro Paschali Gaudio
Paschale Mundo Gaudium
Rex Sempiterne Cælitum
Tristes Erant Apostoli

March 23, 2013

Liturgical Guide: Holy Week

Stained Glass by Thomas Willement - Courtesy of Wikipedia

The hymns used during Holy Week in the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) recall the dramatic events of Christ's passion, death, and resurrection as they are recounted by His Church through Holy Thursday, Good Friday. and the Easter Vigil. In the following video, Fr. Dan O'Reilly of Columbia Catholic Ministry reflects upon Jesus in the of Garden of Gethsemane at the foot of the Mount of Olives. Fr. Dan begins by discussing the significance of the Greek word used in Luke 22: "agonia", which means 'the feelings you have preparing for the struggle ahead'. As he goes through his "agonia", Christ turns to his Father, praying in words reminiscent of the "Our Father" from Luke 11, asking that the Father's will be done, but if possible, that he be delivered from the struggle ahead. In our own times of "agonia", we too can pray the words he taught us in the "Lord's Prayer" and unite our sufferings and sacrifices with his as we journey together, with him through this week of the Passion of the Lord.



LITURGY OF THE HOURS (ICEL, 1975)
87. Lord, Your Glory in Christ We Have Seen
92. Take Up Your Cross
97. When I Survey the Wondrous Cross
104. O Sacred Head, Surrounded
105. Were You There
106. This I Ask (John 15)
107. Have Mercy, O Lord
108. I Shall Praise the Savior's Glory
109. The Word of God Proceeding Forth
110. My Loving Savior
111. Christ, Victim for the Sins of Men

DIVINE OFFICE (1974)
20. Man of sorrows, Wrapt in Grief
21. O Cross of Christ Immortal Tree
22. Abroad the Regal Banners Fly
23. O Sacred Head Ill Usèd
24. My Song is Love Unknown

March 21, 2013

Liturgical Guide: Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord

Fresco from Parish Church of Zirl, Austria - Courtesy of Wikipedia

The hymns used on Palm Sunday in the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) recall the entrance of Christ into Jerusalem as Holy Week begins. In the following video, Fr. Robert Barron of Word On Fire Ministries reflects upon the significance these events would have had for 1st century Jews. He begins with Jesus' approach "from the east" and the prophetic foretelling in Ezekiel 43 when the Shekinah, the Glory of Yahweh (that had left the Temple in Ezekiel 10) would return to reclaim the his Temple. Fr. Barron continues by quoting  Zechariah 9:9 and other Old Testament passages relating to the promised return of the Davidic King, Jesus the Son of David who arrives triumphant on Palm Sunday only be crucified on Good Friday, with above him the inscription: "I am the King of the Jews".



LITURGY OF THE HOURS (1975)
59. The King of Glory
87. Lord, Your Glory in Christ We Have Seen
101. Crown Him With Many Crowns
102. Hail, Redeemer, King Divine
103. All Glory, Praise, and Honor
104. O Sacred Head, Surrounded

DIVINE OFFICE (1974)
20. Man of sorrows, Wrapt in Grief
21. O Cross of Christ Immortal Tree
22. Abroad the Regal Banners Fly
23. O Sacred Head Ill Usèd
24. My Song is Love Unknown

ROMAN BREVIARY
Gloria, Laus et Honor

March 18, 2013

Ave Maria

Gratia Plena

Ave Maria, the Latin text of the Hail Mary, has been set to music numerous times and by many of the world's most famous composers including Mozart, Bach, Schubert, Brahms, Rossini, and Gounod. The first half of the prayer is composed of the Angel Gabriel's salutation and St. Elizabeth's Divinely inspired  greeting from Luke 1, with the names of Mary and Jesus added for clarity during the Middle Ages; while the second half (the petition) followed later. The first complete text of the prayer did not appear in print until 1495, when it was published in Girolamo Savonarola's "Esposizione sopra l’Ave Maria." There are many settings of the Latin text in Gregorian Chant. Among the most widely used is the Mode I version, as sung in the following video. In the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Ave Maria is used during Wednesday Evening Prayer.



Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum
benedicta tu in mulieribus
et benedictus fructus ventris tuis, Jesu

Sancta Maria, Mater dei,
ora pro nobis peccatoribus
Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

March 17, 2013

Liturgical Guide: Lent


The hymns used during Lent in the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) mirror the season's themes of baptism, conversion, and forgiveness as we prepare ourselves through prayer, fasting, penance, and almsgiving to celebrate the Paschal mysteries of Holy Week. In the following video, Dr. Scott Hahn of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology reflects upon the 40 days of Lent in light of Sacred Scripture, the living transmission of the faith, and the authoritative teaching of the Church: Genesis 7 (Noah and the Ark),  Exodus 24 (Moses Fasting),  Numbers 13 (12 Spies in the Promised Land),  1 Samuel 17 (David and Goliath),  1 Kings 19 (Elijah Fasts on Mt. Horeb),  Jonah 3 (Jonah in Nineveh),  Matthew 4 (Jesus in the Desert),  and Deuteronomy 6-8 (Quotes used by Jesus). In the early Church we see St. Irenaeus of Lyons (c.115-c.202) writing to Pope St. Victor I (d.199) regarding the practice of fasting prior to Easter. Then, there is reference in the canons of the 1st Council of Nicea (325) to the 40 days of Lent. By the time of St. John Cassian (c.360-c.435), we see this early monk and ascetic writing detailed instruction about Lent. In recent times, Pius XII (1876-1958) promulgated Maxima Redemptionis in 1955 which established the liturgical reform of Holy Week still used today in the Catholic Church.
 

LITURGY OF THE HOURS (1975)
53. The Master Came
85. Now Let Us All with One Accord
86. Creator of the Earth and Skies
87. Lord, Your Glory in Christ We Have Seen
88. Praise to the Holiest
89. The Glory of These Forty Days
90. Grant to Us
92. Take Up Your Cross
93. For Forty Years
94. Lord Who Throughout These Forty Days
95. This is Our Accepted Time
96. Draw Near, O Lord
97. When I Survey the Wondrous Cross
98. Keep in Mind
99. When from the Darkness
100. Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence 

DIVINE OFFICE (1974)
15. God of thy Pity, Unto Us Thy Children
16. O God Creator of Us All
17. Lord Jesus, Think On Me
18. Jesus, the Sun of Ransomed Earth
19. Now Let Us All With One Accord

ROMAN BREVIARY
Audi, Benigne Conditor
Ex More Docti Mystico
Iam, Christe, Sol Iustitiae
O Sol Salutis, Initimis
Precemur Omnes Cernui

March 16, 2013

Hymns from the Liturgy of the Hours (ICEL-1975)

Numerical Index of the hymns found in the Liturgy of the Hours (1975) approved by the Episcopal Conferences of the Antilles, Bangledesh, Burma, Canada, of the Pacific CEPAC (Fiji Islands, Rarotangta, Samoa and Takelau, Tonga), Ghana, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua, New Guinea and The Solomons, The Phillipines, Rhodesia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Uganda, and the United States of America for use in their Dioceses and Confirmed by the Apostolic See. Related: Thematic Index and Alphabetical Index.

1. On This Day, the First of Days
2. Brightness of the Father's Glory
3. Sion, Sing
4. Morning Has Broken
5. Darkness Has Faded
6. When Morning Fills the Sky
7. Lord Whose Love in Humble Service
8. Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven
9. Sing with All the Sons of Glory
10. I Sing the Mighty Power of God
11. All You Nations
12. This Day God Gives Me
13. God Father, Praise and Glory
14. All Creatures of Our God and King
15. O God of Light
16. We Turn to You, O God
17. Christ is the World's Light
18. Breathe on Me, Breath of God
19. From All That Dwell Below the Skies (with Alleluias)
20. From All That Dwell Below the Skies
21. Father, Lord of Earth and Heaven
22. Holy Spirit, Come Confirm Us
23. Come, Holy Ghost, Who Ever One
24. Help Us, O Lord
25. Lord of All Hopefullness
26. Lord of All Being, Throned Afar
27. Almighty Ruler, God of Truth
28. Firmly I Believe and Truly
29. Lord God and Maker of All Things
30. Most Ancient of All Mysteries
31. Faith of Our Fathers
32. Now We Thank We All Our God
33. O Christ, You Are the Light and Day
34. Lord Jesus Christ, Abide With Us
35. The Setting Sun
36. O Father, Whose Creating Hand
37. For the Fruits of His Creation
38. When in His Own Image
39. At the Name of Jesus
40. Love Divine All Loves Excelling
41. Now Fades All Earthly Splendor
42. Day is Done
43. O Worship the King
44. Romans VIII (For Those Who Love God)
45. Let All Things Now Living
46. Father, We Thank Thee
47. We Plough the Fields and Scatter
48. We Praise You, Father, for Your Gifts
49. Holy God, We Praise Thy Name
50. This World, My God
51. Now at Daylight's Ending
52. All Praises to You, O God, This Night
53. The Master Came
54. On Jordan's Bank
55. Maranatha
56. Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus
57. Be Consoled, My People
58. Hear the Herald Voice Resounding
59. The King of Glory
60. Wake, Awake, the Night is Dying
61. Creator of the Stars at Night
62. You Heavens, Open From Above
63. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel
64. The Coming of Our God
65. Behold a Virgin Bearing Him
66. Song of Salvation Drawing Near
67. Behold a Rose of Judah
68. A Child is Born
69. From Heaven High
70. Go Tell It on the Mountain
71. O Come, All Ye Faithful
72. Songs of Praise the Angels Sang
73. Virgin-Born, We Bow Before You
74. What Child is This
75. A Child is Born in Bethlehem
76. Unto Us a Child is Given
77. Sing of Mary, Pure and Lowly
78. Joseph of Nazareth
79. Joy to You
80. O Mary, of All Women
81. As with Gladness Men of Old
82. Sing Praise to Our Creator
83. When Jesus Comes to Be Baptized
84. Songs of Thankfulness and Praise
85. Now Let Us All with One Accord
86. Creator of the Earth and Skies
87. Lord, Your Glory in Christ We Have Seen
88. Praise to the Holiest
89. The Glory of These Forty Days
90. Grant to Us
91. With Hearts Renewed
92. Take Up Your Cross
93. For Forty Years
94. Lord Who Throughout These Forty Days
95. This is Our Accepted Time
96. Draw Near, O Lord
97. When I Survey the Wondrous Cross
98. Keep in Mind
99. When from the Darkness
100. Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence
101. Crown Him With Many Crowns
102. Hail, Redeemer, King Divine
103. All Glory, Praise, and Honor
104. O Sacred Head, Surrounded
105. Were You There
106. This I Ask (John 15)
107. Have Mercy, O Lord
108. I Shall Praise the Savior's Glory
109. The Word of God Proceeding Forth
110. My Loving Savior
111. Christ, Victim for the Sins of Men
112. Alleluia, The Strife is O'er
113. In the Midst of Death (We Who Were Once Dead)
114. I Am the Bread of Life
115. Christ Jesus Lay in Death's Strong Bands
116. At the Lamb's High Feast
117. The Day of Resurrection
118. Jesus Christ is Ris'n Today
119. Ye Sons and Daughters
120. Christ the Lord is Risen Today (Wesley)
121. Alleluia! Sing to Jesus
122. Hail Thee, Festival Day
123. Christ the Lord is Risen Today (Leeson)
124. Let the Earth Rejoice and Sing
125. Praise Him As He Mounts the Skies
126. The Head That Once Was Crowned with Thorns
127. Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, Come
128. The Spirit of God
129. Holy Spirit, God of Light
130. Splendor of Creation (Send Forth Your Spirit)
131. All Hail, Adored Trinity
132. Holy, Holy, Holy
133. Come Thou Almighty King
134. Lord Who at Your First Eucharist Did Pray
135. God with Hidden Majesty
136. O Christ, Redeemer of Mankind
137. Heart of Christ
138. To Christ, the Prince of Peace
139. Come to Me
140. Shepherd of Souls, in Love Come, Feed Us
141. To Jesus Christ, Our Sovereign King
142. Great Saint Andrew
143. Hail to the Lord Who Comes
144. When Mary Brought Her Treasure
145. Look Down to Us, Saint Joseph
146. The Great Forerunner of the Morn
147. What Fairer Light
148. O Raise Your Eyes on High and See
149. 'Tis Good, Lord, To Be Here
150. O Cross of Christ Immortal Tree
151. Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens, Adore Him
152. They Come, God's Messengers of Love
153. You Holy Angels Bright
154. Christ is Made Our Sure Foundation
155. The Church's One Foundation
156. Mary, Crowned with Living Light
157. Mary Immaculate, Star of the Morning
158. Holy Mary, Now We Crown You
159. Mother of Christ
160. Hail, This Festival Day
161. Rejoice, O Virgin Mary
162. Hail, Holy Queen (Deiss)
163. The God Whom Earth and Sea and Sky
164. Mother of Holy Hope
165. Mary the Dawn
166. Praise to Mary, Heaven's Gate
167. Queen of Heaven
168. The Eternal Gifts of Christ the King
169. Now Let the Heav'ns Resound with Praise
170. Christ, in Whose Passion Once Was Sown
171. A Mighty Fortress is Our God
172. For All the Saints
173. Amazing Grace
174. Loving Shepard of Thy Sheep
175. The King of Love My Shepherd Is
176. Rise Up, O Men of God
177. This is the Feast Day of the Lord's True Witness
178. Now, From the Heav'ns Descending
179. Now Let Us Praise
180. The Beatitudes
181. Blest Are the Pure in Heart
182. O God, Our Help in Ages Past
183. Who Would True Valor See
184. O Radiant Light, O Sun Divine
185. May Flights of Angels Lead You On Your Way
186. God of Truth Prepare Our Minds
187. Lord, Your Word Abiding
188. God, Whose Almighty Word
189. Eternal Father, Through Your Word
190. In Ancient Times God Spoke to Man
191. Lord Jesus, Once You Spoke to Men

Ye Who Own the Faith of Jesus

Hail Mary, Full of Grace

Ye Who Own the Faith of Jesus was written by the Anglican Priest and educator, Vincent Stuckey Stratton Coles (1845-1929). It was one of three contributions he made to the English Hymnal of 1906. It is set to the tune, Den das Vaters Sinn Geboren by the Lutheran Pastor, Johann Anastasius Freylinghausen (1670-1739). In the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin May, Ye Who Own the Faith of Jesus is used in the Office of Readings.

March 13, 2013

May Flights of Angels Lead You On Your Way

To Paradise and Heavens Eternal Day

May Flights of Angels Lead You On Your Way is a 1969 paraphrase by the Scottish theologian and hymnwriter, Fr. James Quinn S.J. (1919-2010) of the ancient Latin hymn, In Paradisum (Into Paradise). In Paradisum was traditionally used as an antiphon sung by a choir as the body is taken out of the Church in a Requiem Mass or at the burial. The text has been used by many composers, most famously by Gabriel Fauré. May Flights of Angels Lead You On Your Way is set to a variation of the 1875 tune, Unde Et Memores by William Henry Monk (1823-1889). The following video is sung to an alternative tune which I have been unable to identify. In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Office of the Dead.

March 11, 2013

O Radiant Light, O Sun Divine / Phôs Hilaròn

That Fills the Heavenly Dwelling Place

O Radiant Light, O Sun Divine was written in 1973 by author William G. Storey, Professor Emeritus of Liturgy and Church History at the University of Notre Dame. It is a translation of Phos Hilaron, a 3rd century Greek hymn which is one of the oldest songs of the early Church still in use today (see 2nd video). In the Eastern Orthodox Church the ancient text along with original melody is sung at Vespers and is associated with the lighting of the lamps or candles, which symbolize the light of Christ. O Radiant Light, O Sun Divine is set to the Gregorian plainsong, Jesu, Dulcis Memoria. In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Office for the Dead.


Tune: Jesu, Dulcis Memoria

PHOS HILARON

Phôs hilaròn haghías dóxēs, athanátou Patrós,
ouraníou, haghíou, mákaros, Iēsoû Christé,

elthóntes epì tḕn hēlíou dýsin, idóntes phôs hesperinón,
hymnoûmen Patéra, Hyión, kaì Hághion Pneûma, Theón.

Áxión se en pâsi kairoîs hymneîsthai phōnaîs aisíais,
Hyiè Theoû, zoḕn ho didoús, diò ho kósmos sè doxázei.


March 10, 2013

Who Would True Valor See

To Be A Pilgrim

Who Would True Valor See was written by the English writer and lay preacher, John Bunyan (1628-1688). The text of the hymn is drawn from Part 2, 8th Stage of his famous work of Christian allegory, The Pilgrim's Progress (1678). It is set to the tune Monk's Gate, a traditional Sussex melody adapted for Bunyan's text by the English composer, Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958). Vaughan Williams returned to this hymn throughout his career, culminating in one of his last major works: the opera, The Pilgrim's Progress (1951). The first video below features Vaughan William's 1906 adaption, while the second is by Maddy Prior with The Carnival Band from the album, Sing Lustily and with Good Courage (1990). Both of these versions feature one of the true (and arguably endearing) curiosities of Christian hymnody: the appearance of a 'hobgoblin', a friendly but troublesome creature found in English folklore. Bunyan's opening line of the 3rd stanza: "Hobgoblin nor foul fiend" is sometimes altered to something less mythical, such as "No power of evil fiend", as it is in the Office. In the Liturgy of the Hours, Who Would True Valor See is used in the Common of Holy Men.



WHO WOULD TRUE VALOUR SEE by John Bunyan, 1678 (Public Domain)

Who would true valour see,let him come hither;
One here will constant be, come wind, come weather
There’s no discouragement shall make him once relent
His first avowed intent to be a pilgrim.

Whoso beset him round With dismal stories
Do but themselves confound; his strength the more is.
No lion can him fright, he’ll with a giant fight,
He will have a right to be a pilgrim.

Hobgoblin nor foul fiend can daunt his spirit,
He knows he at the end shall life inherit.
Then fancies fly away, he’ll fear not what men say,
He’ll labor night and day to be a pilgrim.

Performed by Maddy Prior and the Carnival Band

March 9, 2013

O God, Our Help in Ages Past

Our Hope for Years to Come

O God, Our Help in Ages Past is one of the most well known of the 600 hymns written by Isaac Watts (1674-1748). Written in 1714 as a paraphrase of Psalm 90, it was first published in 1719 as part of his collection: The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament. It is sung to the tune, Saint Anne by William Croft (1678-1727). It was composed in 1708 while he was organist at St. Anne's Church in Soho, London. He eventually became organist at Westminster Abbey. In the Liturgy of the Hours, O God, Our Help in Ages Past is used in the Common of Holy Men and in the Common of Holy Women.

Tune: St. Anne

O GOD, OUR HELP IN AGES PAST by Isaac Watts, 1719 (Public Domain)

1. O God, our help in ages past,
our hope for years to come,
our shelter from the stormy blast,
and our eternal home.

2. Under the shadow of thy throne,
thy saints have dwelt secure;
sufficient is thine arm alone,
and our defense is sure.

3. Before the hills in order stood,
or earth received her frame,
rom everlasting thou art God,
to endless years the same.

4. A thousand ages in thy sight
are like an evening gone;
short as the watch that ends the night
before the rising sun.

5. Time, like an ever-rolling stream,
bears all its sons away;
they fly, forgotten, as a dream
dies at the opening day.

6. O God, our help in ages past,
our hope for years to come,
be thou our guide while troubles last,
and our eternal home!

Blest Are the Pure in Heart

Their Soul is Christ's Abode

Blest Are the Pure in Heart was written by the Rev. John Keble (1792-1866). It was initially published in 1819 as a poem (subtitled 'Purification'), with later revisions by various hymnal editors. Keble was an Ordained Priest in the Church of England. Though the parishes he served were humble in size and state, his many published poems on subjects of religious nature were well known. Blest Are the Pure in Heart is set to the tune Franconia, an adaption by the Anglican Minister, William Henry Havergal (1793-1870) of an earlier melody published by Johann Balthasar Konig (1691-1758) in the Harmonischer Lieder-Schatz of 1738. In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Common of Holy Men.



BLEST ARE THE PURE IN HEART by John Keble, 1819 (Public Domain)

1. Blest are the pure in heart,
For they shall see our God;
The secret of the Lord is theirs,
Their soul is Christ's abode.

2. The Lord, who left the heavens
Our life and peace to bring,
To dwell in lowliness with men,
Their Pattern and their King;

3. Still to the lowly soul
He doth himself impart
And for his dwelling and his throne
Chooseth the pure in heart.

4. Lord, we thy presence seek;
May ours this blessing be;
Give us a pure and lowly heart,
A temple meet for thee.

The Beatitudes

Blessed Are Those Who Suffer

The Beatitudes was written Rev. Enrico F. Garzilli. It was first published in 1970 as part of his collection, For To Those Who Love God. He remains active as a composer, writer, and performer. One his most recent works is the musical, Rage of the Heart; based on the true story of the 12th century tragic romance of Abelard and Heloise. The following video features a setting of the Miserere from that stage work. In the Liturgy of the Hours, The Beatitudes is used in the Common of Virgins and the Common of Holy Women.

Miserere from Rage of the Heart

Now Let Us Praise / Fortem Virili Pectore

A Woman Noble, Great

Now Let Us Praise is a 1967 Sr. Jane Marie Perrot (1916-1998) paraphrase of the the Latin hymn, Fortem Virili Pectore by Cardinal Silvio Antoniano (1540-1603). In the Roman Breviary, Fortem Virili Pectore was sung at Vespers and Lauds in the Common of a Holy Woman. Cardinal Antoniano was a member of the commission called by Pope Clement VIII to revise the Breviary. Sister Perrot, a Daughter of Charity was actively involved in Catholic music education and liturgical reform. In 1975 she conducted the choir at the Vatican for the canonization of Elizabeth Ann Seton, America's first native-born saint. Sr. Perrot was the first woman ever to conduct a choir for a Eucharistic liturgy at St. Peter's Basilica. After conducting for over two hours, she said: "I'm joyfully exhausted!". Now Let Us Praise is sung to the 1906 tune, Sine Nomine by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958). In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Common of Holy Women, the Common of Virgins, and the Common of Doctors of the Church.



FORTEM VIRILI PECTORE by Silvio Antoniano

Fortem virili pectore
laudemus omnes feminam,
quæ sanctitatis gloria
ubique fulget inclita.

Hæc sancto amore saucia,
huius caduca sæculi
dum calcat, ad cælestia
iter peregit arduum.

Carnem domans ieiuniis,
dulcique mentem pabulo
orationis nutriens,
cæli potitur gaudiis.

Rex Christe, virtus fortium,
qui magna solus efficis,
huius precatu, quæsumus,
audi benignus supplices.

Iesu, tibi sit gloria,
qui nos beatæ servulæ
sperare das suffragia
et sempiterna præmia.


FORTEM VIRILI PECTORE (from the Roman Breviary)

1. Fortem virili pectore
Laudemus omnes feminam,
Quae sanctitatis gloria
Ubique fulget inclyta.

2. Haec sancto amore saucia,
Dum mundi amorem noxium
Horrescit, ad coelestia
Iter peregit arduum.

3. Carnem domans jejuniis,
Dulcique mentem pabulo
Orationis nutriens,
Coeli potitur gaudiis.

4. Rex Christe virtus fortium,
Qui magna solus efficis,
Hujus precatu, quaesumus,
Audi benignus supplices.

5. Deo Patri sit gloria,
Ejusque soli Filio,
Cum Spiritu Paraclito,
Nunc, et per omne saeculum.

March 7, 2013

Now, From the Heav'ns Descending

All the Saints in Glory, From Every Time and Place  

Now, from the Heav'ns Descending was written by the Scottish theologian and hymnwriter, Fr. James Quinn S.J. (1919-2010). It was first published in 1969 as part of his collection,  New Hymns for All Seasons. He composed some 300 hymns. One of the last he wrote, Let Scotland's Hills was in honor of St. John Ogilvie, Martyr (1579-1615), Scotland's first Post-Reformation saint. Fr. Quinn was vice postulator for the cause of his canonization, which happened in 1976. Now From the Heav'ns Descending is sung to the tune Aurelia, written in 1864 by Samuel S. Wesley (1810-1876), grandson of Charles Wesley. In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Common of Doctors of the Church.


Tune: Aurelia

This is the Feast Day of the Lord's True Witness / Iste Confessor Domini Colentes

Let All Creation Celebrate His Goodness

This is the Feast Day of the Lord's True Witness is a 1972 Peter J. Scagnelli translation of the 8th century Latin hymn Iste Confessor Domini Colentes (2 versions are shown below), traditionally sung at Vespers and Matins in the Common of Confessors and Bishops. The anonymous work may have been composed in honor of St. Martin of Tours. The translation is set to the tune, Iste Confessor (Angers).  It can also be sung to Iste Confessor (Rouen), as shown in the 1st video. In the Liturgy of the Hours, This is the Feast Day of the Lord's True Witness is used in the Common of Doctors of the Church. For an alternative translation see my post: This is the Day Whereon the Lord's True Witness / Iste Confessor.

Tune: Iste Confessor (Rouen)


ISTE CONFESSOR DOMINI COLENTES (from the Roman Breviary)

1. Iste Confessor Domini colentes
Quem pie laudant populi per orbem:
Hac die laetus meruit beatas
Laudis honores.

2. Qui pius, prudens, humilis, pudicus,
Sobriam duxit sine labe vitam.
Donec humanos animavit aurae
Spiritus artus.

3. Cujus ob praestans meritum frequenter,
Ægra quae passim jacuere membra,
Viribus morbi domitis, saluti
Restituuntur.

4. Noster hinc illi chorus obsequentem
Concinit laudem, celebresque palmas;
Ut piis ejus precibus juvemur
Omne per ævum.

5. Sit salus illi, decus, atque virtus,
Qui super cæli solio coruscans,
Totius mundi seriem gubernat,
Trinus et unus. Amen


Gregorian Chant

ISTE CONFESSOR DOMINI SACRATUS

1. Iste confessor Domini sacratus
Festa plebs cuius celebrat per orbem,
Hodie letus meruit secreta,
Scandere Cœli.

2. Qui pius, prudens, humilis, pudicus,
Sobrius, castus fuit et quietus
Vita, dum presens vegetavit ejus
Corporis artus.

3. Ad sacrum cuius tumulum frequenter,
Membra languentem modo sanitati,
Quo libet morbo fuerint gravata,
Restituuntur.

4. Unde nunc noster chorus in honorem
Ipsius hymnum canit nunc libenter,
Ut piis ejus meritis juvemur
Omne per aevum.

 5. Sit salus illi decus atque virtus,
Qui supra cœli residens cacumen,
Totius mundi machinam gubernat,
Trinus et unus.

Rise Up, O Men of God

Sent Forth to Serve the Needs of Men

Rise Up, O Men of God was written by American Presbyterian clergyman, William Pierson Merrill (1867-1954). It was first published in 1911 in the Pres­by­ter­i­an news­pa­per, The Con­ti­nent. The editor of the paper had expressed to Merrill the need for a hymn of brotherhood in the Church. He turned the idea over in his mind till one day, traveling onboard a streamer on Lake Michigan headed to Chicago the words suddenly came to mind. It is sung to the tune, Festal Song written in 1894 by American composer and organist, William Henry Walter (1825-1893). In the Liturgy of the Hours, Rise Up, O Men of God is used in the Common of Doctors of the Church.


Tune: Festal Song

RISE UP, O MEN OF GOD by William Merrill, 1911 (Public Domain)

1. Rise up, O men of God!
Have done with lesser things.
Give heart and mind and soul and strength
To serve the King of kings.

2. Rise up, O men of God!
The kingdom tarries long.
Bring in the day of brotherhood
And end the night of wrong.

3. Rise up, O men of God!
The church for you doth wait,
Her strength unequal to her task;
Rise up and make her great!

4. Lift high the cross of Christ!
Tread where His feet have trod.
As brothers of the Son of Man,
Rise up, O men of God!

March 6, 2013

The King of Love My Shepherd Is

Your  Cross Will Ever Guide Me

The King Of Love My Shepherd Is, is an Anthony G. Petti (1932-1985) adaption of the 1868 Sir Henry W. Baker (1821-1877) paraphrase of Psalm 23. Baker took Holy Orders in the Church of England in 1844. He was closely associated with hymnody in the Church. Besides writing, translating, and composing a number of hymns, his most notable role was as Ed­it­or-in-Chief of the first edition of Hymns An­cient and Mo­dern (1861) which sold over 60 million copies. The King of Love My Shepherd Is has proven to be his most enduring work. It is said that as he lay dying his final words were those of the 3rd stanza: "Perverse and foolish, oft I strayed, but yet in love he sought me; and on his shoulder gently laid, and home, rejoicing, brought me." It is sung to the tune: St. Columba, a traditional Irish melody. In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Common of Pastors and with the Office for the Dead.



THE KING OF LOVE MY SHEPHERD IS by Henry Baker, 1868 (Public Domain)

1. The King of love my Shepherd is,
Whose goodness faileth never,
I nothing lack if I am His
And He is mine forever.

2. Where streams of living water flow
My ransomed soul He leadeth,
And where the verdant pastures grow,
With food celestial feedeth.

3. Perverse and foolish oft I strayed,
But yet in love He sought me,
And on His shoulder gently laid,
And home, rejoicing, brought me.

4. In death’s dark vale I fear no ill
With Thee, dear Lord, beside me;
Thy rod and staff my comfort still,
Thy cross before to guide me.

5. Thou spread’st a table in my sight;
Thy unction grace bestoweth;
And O what transport of delight
From Thy pure chalice floweth!

6. And so through all the length of days
Thy goodness faileth never;
Good Shepherd, may I sing
Thy praise Within Thy house forever.

March 3, 2013

Loving Shepard of Thy Sheep

Where Thou Leadest, I Will Go

Loving Shepherd of Thy Sheep was written by Jane Elizabeth Leeson (1807-1882). It was first published in 1842 as part of her collection, Hymns and Scenes of Child­hood. Though little is known of this Catholic convert, the simple and direct expressions of faith found in her "Infant Hymnings", have earned a place in many hymnals representing a wide spectrum of Christian beliefs. Loving Shepherd of Thy Sheep is sung to the 1863 tune, Buckland by the Anglican Clergyman and organ builder, Dr. Leigh­ton G. Hayne (1836-1883). In the Liturgy of the Hours it is used in the Common of Pastors.



LOVING SHEPHERD OF THY SHEEP by Jane Elizabeth Leeson, 1842 (Public Domain)

1. Loving Shepherd of Thy sheep,
Keep Thy lamb, in safety keep;
Nothing can Thy power withstand,
None can pluck me from Thy hand.

2. Loving Savior, Thou didst give
Thine own life that we might live,
And the hands outstretched to bless
Bear the cruel nails’ impress.

3. I would praise Thee every day,
Gladly all Thy will obey,
Like Thy blessèd ones above
Happy in Thy precious love.

4. Loving Shepherd, ever near,
Teach Thy lamb Thy voice to hear,
Suffer not my steps to stray
From the straight and narrow way.

5. Where Thou leadest I would go,
Walking in Thy steps below,
Till before my Father’s throne
I shall know as I am known.