April 6, 2015

Magnificat (Canticle of Mary)

Watercolour by James Tissot (1836-1902) - Wikipedia

The Magnificat is the Canticle of Mary from Luke 1:46-55. It takes it's title from the opening line of the Latin Vulgate translation by St. Jerome: "Magnificat anima mea, Dominum" (My soul doth magnify the Lord). From earliest times, it has been used as a hymn in the Church and is perhaps the oldest Marian hymn. In the Roman Breviary it is sung at Vespers (Evening Prayer).


Magnificat (Tone 2, D, g.)

MAGNIFICAT (from the Latin Vulgate)

Magníficat ánima mea Dóminum.
Et exultávit spíritus meus: in Deo salutári meo.
Quia respéxit humilitátem ancíllae suae:
Ecce enim ex hoc beátam me dicent omnes generatiónes.
Quia fécit mihi mágna qui pótens est: et sánctum nómen eius.
Et misericórdia eius in progénies et progénies timéntibus eum.
Fécit poténtiam in bráchio suo: dispérsit supérbos mente cordis sui.
Depósuit poténtes de sede: et exaltávit húmiles.
Esuriéntes implévit bonis: et dívites dimísit inánes.
Suscépit Ísrael púerum suum: recordátus misericórdiae suae.
Sicut locútus est ad patres nostros:
Ábraham, et sémini eius in saecula.

Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto,
Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in sæcula sæculórum. Amen.

Contemporary English Version: "Holy is His Name" by John Michael Talbot
Song begins at 3:20

CANTICLE OF MARY (from the Divine Office)

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly farmer's foot.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

March 8, 2015

Domine Ne In Furore Tuo

15th Century French Manuscript Illumination - Courtesy of Wikipedia

Domine Ne In Furore Tuo is one of the seven Penitential Psalms. It is the Latin Vulgate translation of Psalm 6, a song of repentance usually attributed to King David from the Book of Psalms. One of the best known musical settings was published in 1620 by the Italian composer and Catholic priest, Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643).



DOMINE, NE IN FURORE TUO (Verses 1-4)

Domine, ne in furore tuo arguas me:
neque in ira tua corripias me.
Miserere mei, Domine, quoniam infirmus sum:
sana me, Domine, quoniam conturbata sunt ossa mea.
Et anima mea turbata est valde:
sed tu, Domine, usquequo?


O LORD, REBUKE ME NOT (Verses 1-4)

O Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger:
nor chasten me in thy displeasure.
Have mercy upon me, O Lord, for I am weak:
O Lord, heal me,
for my bones are troubled.
My soul also is troubled:
but, Lord, how long?