May 3, 2014

Poem: Discipline

My Heart's Desire Unto Thee Is Bent

Discipline is a poem by the Welsh-born English poet, orator, and Anglican priest: George Herbert (1593–1633).  It is included in the Religious Poetry Appendix for Lent and Easter of the Divine Office (1974).

DISCIPLINE by George Herbert (Public Domain)

Throw away thy rod,
Throw away thy wrath:
O my God,
Take the gentle path.

For my hearts desire
Unto thine is bent:
I aspire
To a full consent.

Not a word or look
I affect to own,
But by book,
And thy book alone.

Though I fail, I weep:
Though I halt in pace,
Yet I creep
To the throne of grace.

Then let wrath remove;
Love will do the deed:
For with love
Stony hearts will bleed.

Love is swift of foot;
Love’s a man of war,
And can shoot,
And can hit from farre.

Who can scape his bow?
That which wrought on thee,
Brought thee low,
Needs must work on me.

Throw away thy rod;
Though man frailties hath,
Thou art God:
Throw away thy wrath.

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